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's going through? punting the debt ceiling. a vote is going to go through today. >> punting it down three more months. >> hal: a three-month wait to deal with -- >> because why get done today what you can put off? >> hal: because people are still glowing in the aftermath of the inauguration. people are still recognizing the president -- their message that the president isn't interested in deficits and handling it because he did mention it in his inauguration. he did mention doing in a balanced approach and the american people agree with him on that part. so if they have to act on it in the next week, people are still that much engaged. they're hoping in three months the american public will disengage enough for them to create another false narrative. >> so when we talk about rating the debt ceiling. we've already racked up the bills and we have to pay them. that's an obvious -- that's the fact. >> hal: right. >> they like to combine the two right and make it about future spending and paying off the bills. the president says it over and over and over again but it doesn't stick. don't under
toy with the debt ceiling and putting the chances of default at risk, that would be disastrous. we've kind of avoided that for now. don't forget, the fiscal cliff itself is a device that was put in place because of the current situation, because we can't come to an agreement on everything. >> but now it may actually be fostering a lack of bipartisanship, right? the snake has eaten its own tail. >> yes, exactly. >> i love that. it's so useful. >> losing our appetites, right? >> in terms of the other piece, the austerity program that the republicans would have us on, you know, for a long time we've been able to look -- not a long time, but at least a year we've been able to look at what has happened to the u.k. and their economy and sort of this fiscal austerity and how it actually hasn't worked, and as andrew points out, do you think republicans are sort of finally coming to terms with that notion? >> i don't think so. that goes against everything that they stand for. the fact that that would not work. it's funny. andrew mentioned the imf issued some concerns specifically when talki
the country's economy as unstable as possible. the house averted the debt ceiling fight. at least some republicans. 33 members of the house gop still broke rank. by averting, we, of course, mean punting the ticking time bomb three months down the road. >> another 90 days away so we can continue to royle this congress, this country, our people, and our economy. >> we should not even be having a debate. it should be no doubt that the full faith and credit of the united states will be honored, and that is what our constitution says. >> the gimmick nature of this whole thing i won't elaborate on, has been done before. >> either way, the passage of this bill has allowed lawmakers to skip from brinkmanship to probably more brinkmanship. looming just over the horizon is a budget battle that could shut down the government and automatic steep spending cuts that could cost thousands of jobs. welcome to the new normal in washington. joining us now from davos, switzerland, is cnbc's squawk box co-host "new york times" columnist and author of too big to fail, andrew ross sorkin. it is great to see
of saying hey, we're not going to lift the debt ceiling, you say, yeah, we will for three months and then go ahead and pass a budget in that time period. is that possible? >> i sure hope so. obviously that's the goal. that's been my goal for the last 18 months since i've been in the senate. obviously to push the senate to do something. as you mentioned, we haven't had a budget for almost four years. washington, d.c i think we can agree on one thing, that the worst run institution in america right now is the united states congress. we need to do something different. >> brian: so to do that, you got to get to some control over your own colleagues and to do that, hold on to their paycheck. republicans like darrell issa say i think that's unconstitutional. >> there is a lot of people in washington, d.c. that obviously don't want to cut their pay. the purpose of that constitutional amendment was to make sure that members of congress didn't enrich themselves during the legislative session. i'll tell this to darrell issa and nails wants to make this argument. cut your pay and go back to your distri
, today republicans in the house are expected to vote on a plan that's going to defuse the debt ceiling crisis at least temporarily. republicans are planning to offer legislation that will suspend the enforcement of the federal debt limit for at least three months, allowing the government to keep borrowing money to pay for all of its current obligations. in exchange, the house gop'ers want the democratic-controlled senate to do something they haven't done in 1,365 days, pass a budget. something that body hasn't done since 2009. now, instead of demanding spending cuts, republicans have added a provision to the bill that would suspend lawmakers' own paychecks if their chamber fails to pass a budget by april 15th. that's a lot like actually the no labels, no budget, no pay plan that that organization's been dealing with, talking about for a long time. michael steele, i think that's a great idea. >> i do, too. >> if you don't do your job -- >> why get paid for it? >> and the democrats in the senate haven't done their job in that many days, why pay them? >> i don't think you should. in fact,
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5